FETHIYE & OLUDENIZ

Modern Fethiye is located on the site of the ancient city of Telmessos, the ruins of which can be seen in the city, e.g. the Hellenistic theatre by the main quay.  Telmessos was the most important city of Lycia, with a recorded history starting in the 5th century BC.

A Lycian legend explains the source of the name Telmessos as follows: The god Apollo falls in love with the youngest daughter of the King of Phoenicia, Agenor. He disguises himself as a small dog and thus gains the love of the shy, withdrawn daughter. After he reappears as a handsome man, they have a son, whom they name 'Telmessos' (the land of lights).

The city became part of the Persian Empire after the invasion of the Persian general Harpagos in 547 BC, along with other Lycian and Carian cities. Telmessos then joined the Attic-Delos Union established in mid-5th century BC. and although it later left the union and became an independent city, continued its relations with the union until the 4th century BC. 

Very little is known of the city during Byzantine times. Surviving buildings attest to considerable prosperity during late Antiquity, but most were abandoned in the 7th–8th centuries due to the Muslim threat. In the 12th–13th centuries there are signs of renewed prosperity: Makre (new name of the city)’s city walls were enlarged, a report from 1106 names the city a centre for perfume production, and geographical works from the 13th century describe the city as a commercial centre. The area fell to the Turks in the late 12th or early 13th century. Under the name of Megri, the city became part of the Ottoman Empire in 1424.

The town grew considerably in the 19th century, and had a large Greek population at this time. Following the population exchange between Greece and Turkey , the Greeks of Makri founded the town of Nea Makri (New Makri) in Greece . The town was resettled with Turks from Greece . In 1934, the city was renamed 'Fethiye' in honor of Fethi Bey, one of the first pilots of the Ottoman Air Force, killed on an early mission.

Fethiye has experienced many earthquakes. Last significant ones date to 1957 and 1961, with 67 casualties and 3200 damaged buildings after the 25.04.1957 earthquake. The town has been rebuilt since then and now has a modern harbor and a marina.

Oludeniz (literally Dead Sea, due to its calm waters even during storms) is a small village and beach resort near Fethiye, on the Turquoise Coast of southwestern Turkey , at the conjunction point of the Aegean and Mediterranean seas. It is located south of Fethiye, near Mount Babadağ.

Oludeniz remains one of the most photographed beaches on the Mediterranean. It has a secluded sandy bay at the mouth of Oludeniz, on a blue lagoon. The beach itself is a pebble beach. The lagoon is a national nature reserve and construction is strictly prohibited. The seawater of Oludeniz is famous for its shades of turquoise and aquamarine, while its beach is an official Blue Flag beach, frequently rated among the top 5 beaches in the world by travelers and tourism journals alike.

Oludeniz is also famous for its paragliding opportunities. It is regarded as one of the best places in the world to paraglide due to its unique panoramic views, and Mount Babadag's exceptional height. The Lycian Way is a long-distance trail which starts from Oludeniz and eventually reaches Olympos and the nearby settlements, with a total length of over 500 km. It is regarded as one of the most popular routes for hiking in the world.